The Trump Team

With President-elect Donald Trump scheduled to be inaugurated in less than two months, Casey Kroll analyses the potential next cabinet.


Following his electoral victory, Donald Trump must nominate candidates to fill in the most important positions in the world. (Photo: CNN)

Following his electoral victory, Donald Trump must nominate candidates to fill in the most important positions in the world. (Photo: CNN)

He did it. He defied all odds and won the Presidency of the United States of America. Now, Donald John Trump must fill in 4,000 different positions to assist him when he is inaugurated president on 20th January 2016. So far, Trump has named a few candidates officially and nominated others. Rumors are swirling on other important positions as well. Here are some of the most important positions he’s either filled or nominated – and whether they are exceptional or horrible choices:

The Good Nominees:

 Former General James Mattis – Secretary of Defense: Retired four-star General Mattis is one of Trump’s finest choices so far. In Iraq, Mattis led troops and ran the US Central Command. He served in the Marine Corps for more than four decades and led a task force in southern Afghanistan in 2001. He has had some controversial quotes (“It’s fun to shoot some people,”) but is generally seen in good light. The only hiccup is Mattis would need a waiver from Congress to be eligible. One of the most important roles Mattis could potentially have is shaping the fight against ISIS.

Betsy DeVos – Secretary of Education: Betsy DeVos is a former chairwoman of the Michigan Republican Party and a highly outspoken education activist.  She has started some controversy by pushing for vouchers in order to allow families to enter private schools. As the chair of the American Federation for Children, she is an outstanding nominee for Trump’s promise for school-choice and a reformation of federally controlled education. As the Secretary of Education, DeVos would have several important choices to make such as a new approach to student loan debt.

Tom Price – Secretary of Health and Human Services: One of the most discussed and criticised pieces of legislations from President Obama came in the form of Obamacare. With spiking premiums, many agree that the plan needs to be altered. Tom Price, chairman of the House Budget Committee, will take that responsibility. He has already proposed several plans to alter President Obama’s universal healthcare plan, such as the Empowering Patients First Act, molding a new healthcare system with a “patient-centered solutions.”

Former four-star General James Mattis is an excellent nominee for Trump and is viewed positively by many. (Photo: Reuters)

Former four-star General James Mattis is an excellent nominee for Trump and is viewed positively by many. (Photo: Reuters)

The Bad Nominees:

Stephen Bannon – White House Chief Strategist: Bannon, who ran Breitbart News, is a poor choice by Trump. Having been accused of anti-Semitic remarks and denounced by the Anti-Defamation League, Bannon is only bringing bad publicity to Trump’s name; a ripe reason for opponents of Trump to criticise the future President. Is Bannon all that everyone says that he is? Probably not. He, however, will still be seen poorly in the eyes of millions, which is not something Trump wants to be linked to early on.

Ben Carson – Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Donald Trump nominated former neurosurgeon Ben Carson for the HUD position.  This would be Trump’s most criticised choice: Although he was a brilliant medical professional, Carson was easily criticised during his campaign for his lack of knowledge in many areas of politics. It would not be wise for Trump to nominate candidates with no experience.

Rudy Giuliani, Newt Gingrich, Chris Christie, Kellyanne Conway – any position: All of these Trump supporters have been rumored for a position in his cabinet, and all of them would be a mistake on Trump’s part. Giuliani is inexperienced and has been solely a promoter for Trump; Gingrich has also acted as a surrogate for Trump and insulted Fox News hosts; Chris Christie is still recovering from Bridge-Gate and is one of the most unfavorable governors in history; and Kellyanne Conway is a pollster who is loyal but highly inexperienced. Any of these nominations would be a drastic mistake and strategic error for Trump.

Dual Loyalty?

 One of the most eyed and prized spots Trump has filled is The Secretary of State. As the SoS, the nominee would potentially act as a major ambassador to foreign nations and a key player in foreign affairs. Controversial figures such as former CIA Director David Petraeus and former US Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton had been rumored, but Trump’s unlikely pick was in Rex Tillerson, the ExxonMobil CEO. By picking Tillerson, it is much more difficult (in fact, highly unlikely) for the State nominee to be accepted by the Senate, especially due to his close ties with Russia and Vladimir Putin. The nomination of Tillerson brings Russia into the spotlight and what role the controversial country will play in swaying President-elect Trump’s foreign policy legislation. Many fear that with Tillerson as Secretary of State, Russia will use him as a puppet and have the advantage in US-Russian relations.

With the election over and a new president to be sworn in soon, the American people want to know who will work alongside President-elect Trump for the next four years. Trump’s nominations so far have been a mix of good and bad, with the potential for more wise choices. If Trump can continue to pick strong conservatives (and avoid the “alt-right” movement that he denounced), he will be able to bring change to Washington DC – change the American people have been waiting for eagerly.

Want to support young writers? Then please share!
Facebook
Facebook
LinkedIn
Follow by Email
RSS
SHARE
Casey Kroll
Follow me

Casey Kroll

Political Correspondent (Republican) at Filibuster
Casey Kroll is a 17-year-old writer from San Diego, California. Casey is an avid studier of foreign policy. A Republican, Casey is a proud conservative and has a fondness for debating and discussing politics. His favorite political commentators include Ben Shapiro, Dennis Prager, and Charles Krauthammer. He enjoys engaging in robust debate with those who do not share his points of view, and attempts to win over those who disagree. Casey also plays the piano, performs magic, and writes short stories in his free time. He tweets at @casey3040.
Casey Kroll
Follow me

Latest posts by Casey Kroll (see all)

Want to support young writers? Then please spread the word! Thank you.